Monday, February 26, 2018

Ashley Madison extramarital-affairs Web site is adding 20,000 customers every day, proving that the old adage "a sucker is born every minute" must be true



Ashley Madison, the Canada-based extramarital-affairs Web site that was at the heart of perhaps the most notorious scandal of the digital era, has recovered to the point that it now is adding 20,000 customers per day, according to a report at CBS News.

Most of us have heard the adage "a sucker is born every minute." Based on the latest data about Ashley Madison's customer growth, that must be true.

What do we know about Ashley Madison? It has a history of failing to protect customer data, leading to a 2015 hack by a group calling itself The Impact Team. The company has displayed an utter lack of integrity, admitting it used chatbots to lure would-be cheating males and then threatened to expose them when they complained; in other words, many of the available "women" on the site aren't women at all -- they are fake bots, designed to arouse easily conned men. Finally, the company reached an $11.2 million settlement in a federal lawsuit claiming widespread damages for customers who were exposed in the Ashley Madison hack.

Here at Legal Schnauzer, we have covered the Ashley Madison story more extensively and in more depth, than any other news site -- focusing on customers with high-end financial status, as reported in an article at fusion.net.

You might think a company that coughed up $11.2 million to compensate customers it had damaged would have a hard time finding new customers. But according to a recent report at CBS News, you would be wrong; Ashley Madison, in fact, is reeling in new suckers at an astonishing rate.

Focus of the CBS story was "Infidelity: Why the oldest taboo continues to be broken." For example, we learn this:

It's a subject as old as marriage... and usually more taboo than divorce.

"It is the only commandment repeated twice in the Bible, right? Once for doing it, and once for thinking about it," said psychotherapist Esther Perel, who has been studying infidelity for more than a decade.

"Ninety-three percent of Americans think that infidelity is morally wrong -- more morally wrong than cloning, than suicide, or than domestic violence," Perel said. "It's an interesting location for something that is not criminal, that is totally consensual."

The contradictions of unfaithfulness raise a question: why do so many people cheat?

These days, there's ample chance to examine the issue. In recent weeks, we've seen President Trump deny new reports of a affair with an adult film star and a Playboy model in 2006. Meanwhile, Missouri Governor Eric Greitens has acknowledged an affair with his hairdresser, and Nashville Mayor Megan Barry has apologized for sleeping with her bodyguard … which makes her part of a trend.

According to a survey by the Kinsey Institute at Indiana University, female philanders (19%) are catching up with their male counterparts (23%) for the first time on record.

The story focused on a woman named Kristie, and that led to . . . Ashley Madison:

Human beings such as Kristie, a mother of two, who asked that we not use her real name or reveal where she lives.

"I can't blame him and I can't blame me -- it's 50-50," she told Dokoupil. "We just didn't like each other. We got to a point where we just didn't like each other anymore."

"I was not looking for love, was not looking to leave my husband, was just looking for companionship."

Like many women, she resolved to stay in an unhappy marriage for the sake of her kids, until one night a few years ago when she also resolved to stray.

"I was sitting on the bed, and he said something to me very disrespectful, very hurtful," said Kristie. "And I just snapped. I pulled my phone out, and I went, 'Woman looking for men to have affairs with.'"

She ended up on Ashley Madison, a website that helps men and women pursue what's known as "married dating."

Yes, married dating.

The CBS reporters seemed flummoxed by the notion of "married dating." So they went to a supposed expert on the subject:

Who came up with that term? "I think it's been around a long time," said Ruben Buell, the president of Ashley Madison's parent company, Ruby Life. "A lot of this came out of singles dating, where you're on single sites, but 30-plus percent of the people on the site were married. So somebody took a category and created Ashley Madison."

Even after a damaging leak of user names in 2015, Buell says the Ashley Madison site is booming, with 20,000 new members a day.

A reasonable person might expect the doors to Ashley Madison's Toronto headquarters to be shuttered, with cob webs hanging from windows. But hey, the place is thriving -- even though it's proven to be a fraud, conning customers and threatening them when they complain.

If The Impact Team or similar outfit is so inclined, I'm guessing there will be another hack at Ashley Madison within the next couple of years or so. Our reports on the first hack regularly attract comments that disparage our coverage and express sympathy for the customers who were stupid enough to sign up with Ashley Madison. (Note: I've seen extensive evidence that many such comments are from automated bots, so like most things related to AM, they aren't legit either.)

Will the customers still rushing to sign up with AM merit our sympathy when (and if) a future hack hits the headlines?

They won't get any from me.

18 comments:

Anonymous said...

methinks LS doth protest too much

Anonymous said...

20,000 new customers a day? Jeebers, are they all from the Oval Office?

Anonymous said...

Anybody who ever doubts the stupidity of humankind need to read this post.

Anonymous said...

@12:55 --

Seems to me Schnauzer should be celebrating, not protesting. The next time AM is hacked -- and it will happen -- it should give him millions of new idiots to unmask.

Anonymous said...

This is like seeing a pond in Florida, with a big sign that says, "Alligators, no swimming!" and deciding, "Hey, this is a nice day for a dip, why worry about a sign?"

Anonymous said...

What a joke. These horny dudes don't understand there are hardly any women on this site? Even Ashley Madison admits that.

Anonymous said...

Important reminder: These guys aren't just looking for a date. They are looking for someone else's wife.

Big difference.

Anonymous said...

This number comes from the Ashley Madison CEO. It might be something he pulled out of his ass. I find it hard to believe there are that many stupid men out there.

Anonymous said...

Married dating?

Hah.

Rules of thumb:

(1) If you want to date, don't get married.

(2) If you want to get married, don't date.

Simple.

Anonymous said...

No way AM is bringing in 20,000 paying customers a day. Maybe they are still getting a lot of goof balls who are so horny they sign up for free to look around for fake women. But 20,000 paying customers? No way.

Anonymous said...

I simply do not get your obsessive focus on AM. More than anything, it speaks to paranoia.

legalschnauzer said...

Paranoia? Do you know what the word means? I don't think you do.

You're welcome to label my reporting with any word you want, but I don't think "paranoia" is what you're looking for.

Anonymous said...

Paranoia is having a mental condition characterized by delusions of persecution, unwarranted jealousy, or exaggerated self-importance, typically elaborated into an organized system.

Paranoiacs exhibit suspicion and mistrust of people or their actions without evidence or justification.

They also:

Doubt the commitment, loyalty, or trustworthiness of others, believing others are using or deceiving them

Are unforgiving and hold grudges

Are hypersensitive and take criticism poorly

Read hidden meanings in the innocent remarks or casual looks of others

Perceive attacks on their character that are not apparent to others; they generally react with anger and are quick to retaliate

Have recurrent suspicions, without reason, that their spouses or lovers are being unfaithful (or in your case, thousands of people you've never met)

Are generally cold and distant in their relationships with others, and might become controlling and jealous

Cannot see their role in problems or conflicts and believe they are always right

Are hostile, stubborn, and argumentative

legalschnauzer said...

@7:00 --

Congrats on being able to use Google. Nice talent you've got there.

How often have you been around me in person? Zero, perhaps? So you have zero evidence to support your Google findings.

What does any of this, even if true (which it isn't), have to do with my reporting on AM?

It doesn't.

But, by golly, you can do a Google search. Thanks for your "insights."

BTW, why don't you put your name on your comment. Why don't you tell us who you are, so readers can evaluate your BS?

legalschnauzer said...

Memo to "Bill Marshall" of Central Virginia:

Your comment, like the first one, is nothing but a cut and paste job off the Web. You've exhibited no expertise about the psychological disorder upon which you claim to provide insight.

You seem to acknowledge that you've never been around me, so you have zero knowledge of the "patient" you claim to "diagnose."

Does "Bill Marshall" of Central Virginia have such an empty life that he feels the need to analyze the psyche of someone he's never met -- all via the stunning ability to cut and paste off the Web.

"Bill Marshall's" fear of giving any contact information suggests perhaps he's a little paranoid himself. Takes one to know one? It also gives zero reason to believe you really are "Bill Marshall" of Central Virginia, which raises questions about your honesty. That could be a sign of borderline personality disorder

Anonymous said...

Your comment, like the first one, is nothing but a cut and paste job off the Web. You've exhibited no expertise about the psychological disorder upon which you claim to provide insight. -- I'd say roughly 75 percent of all your posts are cut and paste jobs off the web.

You seem to acknowledge that you've never been around me, so you have zero knowledge of the "patient" you claim to "diagnose." -- you habitually make claims and assessments of the character, thoughts, intentions, and values of people you have never met.

Does "Bill Marshall" of Central Virginia have such an empty life that he feels the need to analyze the psyche of someone he's never met -- all via the stunning ability to cut and paste off the Web. -- no, actually I am happily retired with a wonderful family and social life.

"Bill Marshall's" fear of giving any contact information suggests perhaps he's a little paranoid himself. Takes one to know one? It also gives zero reason to believe you really are "Bill Marshall" of Central Virginia, which raises questions about your honesty. That could be a sign of borderline personality disorder -- you have a history of viciously attacking people. Why on earth would I expose myself to that?

legalschnauzer said...

@7:31 --

So, you admit you are fearful, without presenting a shred of evidence to support that fear. Sounds like you are paranoid.

Who have I "attacked," viciously or otherwise. Name someone.

BTW, is someone making you come here? If not, and the blog makes you uncomfortable, hit the exits. You won't be missed.

legalschnauzer said...

Memo to @8:44 --

I'm not aware of any "facts" you've presented, so there is nothing to defend. Further, I have no obligation to "defend" anything brought by someone who is too big a coward to even bring his/her name and contact info to the equation.

If you want to ID yourself, I would be happy to discuss via phone. I suspect I've made this offer to you before, but you never have the guts to pursue it.

Until you show a tad of courage, you are a non-entity, who has not brought any facts that merit a response from me.

I already know what your response to this is going to be on this, so don't bother sending it.