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Monday, April 6, 2009

Don Siegelman and the Little Banner That Could

How do important messages about justice reach the public?

Jeff Miles, of Madison, Alabama, shows us one way to get the word out.

In a brief (1:28) video titled "The Little Banner That Could," Miles shows us how a simple message made its way from a small garage in north Alabama to within a few blocks of America's seat of power.

The message? "Free Don Siegelman." And where is it now located? On a house in Washington, D.C., just a few blocks from the Library of Congress and the U.S. House Office Building.

Join us for a little journey into the world of grassroots politics:




By the way, Miles has excellent taste in music. He sets the video to a song called "So Lonely," performed by JetStar 7. As a child of the '70s, my Schnauzer ears immediately said, "That song sounds familiar." Turns out it's an early classic from The Police. I wasn't familiar with JetStar 7, until today, but they do a great job of capturing the mood and reggae beat of the original. Here are Sting and the boys in the "So Lonely" video from 1978:

3 comments:

joyfuljan said...

FREE DON SIEGELMAN HE IS INNOCENT
PLEASE HELP SET HIM FREE HE HAS HAD HIS GOOD NAME DRAGGED THROUGH THE MUD. JAN WATSON

Anonymous said...

The secret that the justice in America does not want the everyday citizen to know is: there always happens to be a grand jury "convened" at all times in every state, local, etc. (except Maryland just outlawed this - interesting, eh?!).

Know Americans that we can ACCESS it is called since at all times it is CONVENED, a grand jury.

It is complex, and attorneys are needed to do the work according to a law professor at Lewis and Clark Law School (Douglas Beloof).

BUT, IT CAN BE DONE.

Time to access that which is convened so we can have some justice for the citizens, after all.

How about ads in papers or simply an internet campaign.

Best,

/rk

legalschnauzer said...

Anon:
You raise an interesting point, one that many Americans (including me) probably are clueless about. Would love to hear someone like Scott Horton, of Harper's, address this at his No Comment blog.